Genevieve Nnaji’s ‘Road To Yesterday’ is slow but don’t worry, it pulls through


Genevieve Nnaji’s ‘Road To Yesterday’ is slow but don’t worry, it pulls through

By True Nollywood Stories

Genevieve Nnaji and ‘Road to Yesterday’ leading man, Oris Erhuero at the movie premiere. Photo: BHM

Road to Yesterday stars Genevieve Nnaji, popular award-winning Nigerian actor. Being one of the banned actors in 2005 alongside Omotola Jakande-Ekeinde and Ramsey Nouah for being unaffordable to cast by filmmakers, these crop of actors became very scarce on movie screens on their return, only showing up like the moon and being celebrated like Ramadan at every movie appearance.

Many of them have gone on to create their own shows and make their own movies which afford them a chance to put whoever they like and create whatever they want. And this is what Road to Yesterday is, a creation of the actor herself, a first, premiered in 2015. A second production by the actor is in the works, but that’s for another day.

Road to Yesterday tells the story of a couple, Izu and Vicky who are faced with a marriage crisis. Vicky moves out of the country to cool off for a while with her daughter, then returns to Nigeria on her mother’s insistence and an excuse of Izu’s relation’s funeral to try and fix her marriage.

She is met by a cold Izu who would rather be out drinking with friends than being in the same room as his wife. Eventually, they embark on a road trip to his village for the funeral, and on that trip, they travel back in time to the events that have led them to this point in a bid to try to find common ground and resolve their differences.

Too early in the film, you can tell by the masterful shots that Ishaya Bako is a phenomenal director. The welcoming drone shots of Lagos draw you in and you find yourself quickly settling into the movie. By the tenth minute, you recognize the conflict that is about to ensue, and you’re sold.

Road to Yesterday

With the depth of its mystery, it gets a tad disappointing when you realize what it is really about by a series of flashbacks. The story then becomes nothing special as it explores infidelity as with a thousand others. This doesn’t mean it is bad though, it just doesn’t excite.

Upon their reconciliation, it further lets you down when you realize it has been one long dream. What is it with dreams and movies that have remained inseparable for years?

Nnaji further proves that she is a natural with a flawless performance as Vicky. Oris Erhuero isn’t phenomenal as Izu, as his only expression through the film is stiff and angry, even in places where he smiles with his eyes. The accent he throws in every now and again also throws you off with its inconsistencies.

Chigul Chioma Omeruah plays Onome, Vicky’s friend, and is joined by Nancy Isime and Meg Otanwa. Izu’s friends are also three; Lord Frank, Deyemi Okanlawon and Bolanle Ninalowo.

A common trait among the friends is how they all seem to be overshadowed by the characters of the lead actors. Everything revolves around the lead and their issues.

Ebele Okaro plays Vicky’s mother, Majid Michel – Onome’s cousin, Baaj Adebule – a nurse and Christian Paul – a doctor/old villager.

<img data-attachment-id="15417" data-permalink="http://thenet.ng/2011/07/dbanj-m-i-and-waje-turn-up-for-nehemiah-project/" data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title="D'banj, M.I and Waje Turn Up For Nehemiah Project" data-image-description="

By Dayo Farore

D'Banj performing

It was an inspiring night spiced with great musical performances, comedy and fashion as the Sahara Group boss, Tonye Cole hosted youth, celebs and dignitaries at the inaugural edition of his initiative, ‘Nehemiah Project‘ on Sunday, July 24, 2011 at the Expo Hall of Eko Hotel & Suites. The night featured a great number of celebrities from different arms of the entertainment industry telling their story to inspire the youths from different institutions. Beautifying the night in style were fashion models who lit up the runway courtesy Odio Mimonet and Phunafrique.

The event was anchored by actress Kate Henshaw–Nuttal, comedian Tee A, designer Ohimai Atafo and actress Ireti Doyle with DJ Caise of the BEAT 99.9FM on the wheels of steel. Guests were thrilled by the Explicit Dance Group before Holly Mallam came on stage to tell his life-story while he also made the attendees laugh.

However, the heat of the night began with award winning producer/singer, Cobhams Asuquo as he came on stage to perform one of his songs, ‘Items In the News‘. Cobhams showcased his mastery of his art, using the piano and beautiful vocals. Celebrities also present at the event include comedian Basketmouth, actress Funke Akindele, photographer/singer TY Bello, motivational speaker Fela Durotoye, comedian Ali Baba, make-up artist Tara Fela – Durotoye, on-air personality Toolz of the BEAT 99.9FM and events manager Yewande Zaccheus.

Waje ushered the audience into the night with an amazing performance, but didn’t get a standing ovation like rapper, M.I did. Stepping out with his killer shades, tucked in shirt and a cool blue jean, M.I appreciated the much love with a broad smile as most of the audience pushed their way to the runway. The event came to a very wild end as popstar D’banj straight out of New York made the crowd dance away. That without a doubt, was the biggest performance of the night.

Models on the runway
Toolz, Tee-A, Basket Mouth and Funke Akindele
TY Bello and Holy Mallam
M.I thrilling the crowd
Toyosi Akerele, Fela Durotoye, Tonye Cole and Ali Baba
Ituah Ighodalo and wife Ibidun
John Obayuwana and daughter Jennifer
Tonye Cole and Mr and Mrs Asuquo
D'Prince, D'banj and Dr. Sid performing
The models

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Its predictability notwithstanding, Road to Yesterday is brilliant in many ways, from its cinematography to its soundtracks (you can never go wrong with a Brymo soundtrack really) to its casts’ performances.

When the screenwriter (who also happens to be Ishaya Bako) attempts to reconcile the people in Vicky’s dream to the people in real life, it is an ingenious bit. He stumbles with the dialogue as some of the lines are worn and unoriginal. The movie toggles between flashbacks and reality in a way not many indigenous films have, and bearing the risk of getting confusing, it pulls through.

Produced by Genevieve Nnaji, Chichi Nwoko and Chinny Onwugbenu, Road to Yesterday is an applaudable effort for a debut. It is slow, but it is drama and just maybe requires the pace it gets to give it the desired emotion.

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This post first appeared on TNS.

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